• Land Bank - Restoring Properties
  • Urban CNY-Survey 2.0 LinkedIn-530 x 75 px
  • Syracuse Stage Murder on the Orient Express
  • Alzheimer’s Association
  • CSEA_Help Wanted_Labor Relations
  • 5 for CNY - Learn How
  • Malmgren Concert Black History Month

Celebrating Urban Life Since 1989

Menu Hamburger White
  • Land Bank - Restoring Properties
  • CSEA_Help Wanted_Labor Relations
  • Malmgren Concert Black History Month
  • Alzheimer’s Association
  • 5 for CNY - Learn How
  • Syracuse Stage Murder on the Orient Express
  • Urban CNY-Survey 2.0 LinkedIn-530 x 75 px

Mayor Miner Announces Formal End to JSCB Phase I, Closing Out School Reconstruction Project That Renovated Four Schools, Exceeded Minority and Women Contracting Goals

Now Complete Phase I Resulted in Major Overhauls at Four Schools; Phase II Continues With Renovations Planned at More Schools Across the District

Miner: Through JSCB, We Have Developed Quality Buildings Which Will Educate Another Generation of Young People in Syracuse

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Mayor Stephanie A. Miner today announced the formal end to the work of Phase I of the Joint Schools Construction Board (JSCB) project. The project resulted in four fully renovated schools throughout the Syracuse City School District (SCSD) and smaller renovation projects being completed. The second phase of the project now seeks to complete more renovation projects at schools throughout the district.

“Our community’s biggest investment must be in the next generation who will call Syracuse home. To ensure that each of our children receive the education they deserve, we need to have facilities which are up to that task,” said Syracuse Mayor Stephanie A. Miner. “Through the JSCB, we have developed quality buildings which will serve to educate generations of young people in this city.”

The first phase of the JSCB project resulted in full renovations of four schools: HW Smith, Dr. Weeks, the Public Service Leadership Academy at Fowler, and the Institute of Technology at Syracuse Central. These buildings received more than $150 million in work during the course of the project. Additionally, smaller renovation projects were completed at Clary Middle School and Bellevue Academy.

According to a 2012 report from the Conference of Big 5 School Districts, the average building in the SCSD is 72 years old. Five of the district’s 35 buildings were built before 1920. Phase II of the JSCB authorized $300 million in funding for up to 20 projects. This funding is estimated to cover approximately one-third of the district’s identified building repair needs. The board, codified in the Phase II enabling legislation, includes the Mayor, the Superintendent, three members appointed by the Mayor, and two members appointed by the Superintendent.

Mayor Miner added, “Critically important to the JSCB project is our commitment to minority and women contracting goals, as well as local hiring. We exceeded our goals during Phase I and I look forward to meeting the higher standard set by the board for Phase II.”

Phase I of the JSCB had a 9% minority-owned and 6% women-owned enterprise contracting goal. Those numbers were exceeded, with 12.5% of contracted enterprises being minority-owned and 7.2% being women-owned. 10% minority hiring and 10% women hiring goals were also achieved in Phase I of the project. The second phase of the project has set still more ambitious goals through a project labor agreement (PLA), including 20% MWBE contractors (12% minority and 8% women), 20% minority hiring, measured in overall man or woman hours, and – for the first time – a  goal of 20% of City residents hired on the project, measured in overall man or woman hours.

As part of the PLA, labor unions which plan to work on the project have agreed to place workers who are graduates of JSCB-sponsored or partnered training programs into their apprenticeship programs, assigning them to available work opportunities as part of the school reconstruction program. The unions will be working with the contractors on the project to accomplish this goal.

 

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Local, State & National


Resources

Neighborhoods

Features

Contact Us