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Selma: the story of a movement

The upcoming film Selma, chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition.

1964-65 were years of rapid change within the Civil Rights Movement, this was after the famous,” I Have A Dream” speech. Since then several bombings’ including the well-known church bombing killing 6 children occurred, other groups doubted the concept of nonviolence as an answer to the escalating violence against Blacks.

At the seventh annual SCLC Convention, meeting in Richmond, Virginia it was clear that the movement was at a crossroads. King wanted to continue with the campaign of nonviolence preserving its influences on both races however; there was the looming fear that another Birmingham bombing would set-off a race war. A race war would obliterate nonviolence, leaving the movement open to charges of communist influence. The leadership of SCLC was struggling with alternative plans as to what action to take next.

In the meantime John Lewis, (now a U.S. Congressman) was arrested for carrying a sign that said, One Man/One Vote, led a group of 200 protestors. While in jail Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) leadership planned another protest it would be called, Selma freedom Day. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced “snick”) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 through the involvement of students led by Ella Baker at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The groups’ inception was sparked by a sit-in protest movement initiated on February 1 of that year by four black college students in Greensboro, North Carolina. SNCC also played a major role in the 1961 Freedom Rides designed to test a 1960 Supreme Court ruling that declared segregation in interstate travel facilities unconstitutional.

In 1964 SNCC organized Mississippi Freedom Summer, the Mississippi voter registration effort created conditions for racial reform by bringing together three crucial groups: dynamic and determined SNCC field secretaries, influential regional and local civil rights leaders from Mississippi, and white student volunteers. In August of 1963 the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where Dr. King gave his famous, I have A Dream speech.

There was tension between two groups SCLC and SNCC however; they were able to coordinate effectively major events of the movement. SCLC wanted SNCC to be their youth arm of the movement, SNCC remained defiantly independent of SCLC.

The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement.  Selma tells the real story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and people of all races who participated in the Civil Rights Movement, prompting change that forever altered history.

(Read Urban CNY Sr. Editor, Walt Shepperd’s reflections on what was called “Freedom Summer”https://www.urbancny.com/in-search-of-a-non-violent-movement/)

Photo gallery of iconic moments from the movie Selma, click on image to enlarge.

Selma tag

 

 

 Selma Reviews

 

One dream tag

Lyrics to the Title song from the movie “Glory”

Glory

One day when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh one day when the war is won
We will be sure, we will be sure
Oh glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)

Hands to the Heavens, no man, no weapon
Formed against, yes glory is destined
Every day women and men become legends
Sins that go against our skin become blessings
The movement is a rhythm to us
Freedom is like religion to us
Justice is juxtapositionin’ us
Justice for all just ain’t specific enough
One son died, his spirit is revisitin’ us
Truant livin’ livin’ in us, resistance is us
That’s why Rosa sat on the bus
That’s why we walk through Ferguson with our hands up
When it go down we woman and man up
They say, “Stay down”, and we stand up
Shots, we on the ground, the camera panned up
King pointed to the mountain top and we ran up

One day when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh one day when the war is won
We will be sure, we will be sure
Oh glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)

Now the war is not over, victory isn’t won
And we’ll fight on to the finish, then when it’s all done
We’ll cry glory, oh glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)
We’ll cry glory, oh glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)

Selma’s now for every man, woman and child
Even Jesus got his crown in front of a crowd
They marched with the torch, we gon’ run with it now
Never look back, we done gone hundreds of miles
From dark roads he rose, to become a hero
Facin’ the league of justice, his power was the people
Enemy is lethal, a king became regal
Saw the face of Jim Crow under a bald eagle
The biggest weapon is to stay peaceful
We sing, our music is the cuts that we bleed through
Somewhere in the dream we had an epiphany
Now we right the wrongs in history
No one can win the war individually
It takes the wisdom of the elders and young people’s energy
Welcome to the story we call victory
The comin’ of the Lord, my eyes have seen the glory

One day when the glory comes
It will be ours, it will be ours
Oh one day when the war is won
We will be sure, we will be sure
Oh glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)
Oh glory (Glory, glory)
Hey (Glory, glory)

When the war is won, when it’s all said and done
We’ll cry glory (Glory, glory)
Oh (Glory, glory)

Songwriters
Stephens, John Roger / Lynn, Lonnie Rashid

Published by
Lyrics © EMI Music Publishing

Selma has already garnered an impressive list of awards and nomination including the coveted Golden Globe. The following is a list of accolades

GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD NOMINATIONS

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
BEST ACTOR-DRAMA – David Oyelowo
BEST DIRECTOR – Ava DuVernay
BEST ORIGINAL SONG – Glory by John Legend & Common

WINNNER – AFRICAN-AMERICAN FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION

BEST FILM
BEST ACTOR – David Oyelowo
BEST DIRECTOR – Ava DuVernay
BEST MUSIC – John Legend/Common, “Glory”

WINNER – The Black Film Critics Circle

BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR – Ava DuVernay
BEST ACTOR – David Oyelowo
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS – Carmen Ejogo
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY – Selma
BEST ENSEMBLE

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: 2014 Critics’ Choice Movie Awards Nominations

BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTOR: David Oyelowo
BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
BEST DIRECTOR: Ava DuVernay
BEST SONG: Glory by John Legend & Common

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION

Winner – New Generation Award: Ava DuVernay

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW

WINNER- NBR Freedom of Expression Award

NAACP IMAGE AWARDS NOMINATIONS

OUTSTANDING MOTION PICTURE
OUTSTANDING ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – David Oyelowo
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – Common
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – Wendell Pierce
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – Andre Holland
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – Carmen Ejogo
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – Oprah Winfrey
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN A MOTION PICTURE – Ava DuVernay

INDEPENDENT SPIRIT AWARD NOMINATIONS

BEST FEATURE – Award presented to the producers
BEST DIRECTOR – Ava DuVernay
BEST MALE LEAD – David Oyelowo
BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE – Carmen Ejogo
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY – Bradford Young

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A Celebration of Black Icons in Dance

Community Folk Art Center 805 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, NY, United States

Join Classical Dance Trailblazer, Charles Haislah, The Creative Arts Academy, and CFAC-DanceLab for an evening of captivating performances and dance history. This event is free and open to the community!

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